UP, Credit Card Size Board for Professional Maker Market, Launched on Kickstarter

UP, the credit card computer board for makers powered by Intel Quad Core Atom X5-8300 1.84GHz, running Linux, Windows 10, and Android

We haven’t seen anything like that on the market. We saw plenty of cost effective boards, often powered by RISC technology, and industrial solutions with a wide range of standard form factors, performance and technology but with high prices and poor or absent community support. Continue reading “UP, Credit Card Size Board for Professional Maker Market, Launched on Kickstarter”

Portal is a flexible smartphone that you strap to your arm

The crowdfunding sites of Kickstarter and Indiegogo are places where the strangest ideas can be pitched to the public, but we’ve seen few devices as unusual as the Portal. This “wearable smartphone” is currently looking for $300,000 in funding on Indiegogo and features a flexible 6-inch TFT display that wraps around your lower arm. Continue reading “Portal is a flexible smartphone that you strap to your arm”

The AirButlr Housekeeping Drone is Probably The Most Excited That You’ll Ever Get About a Cleaning Product

The AirButlr is a prototype drone that can be programed to automatically carry out preset cleaning tasks around the home, including cleaning windows and mowing the lawn. It is currently in the prototype stage, however the AirButlr creators are preparing to launch a Kickstarter campaign. Continue reading “The AirButlr Housekeeping Drone is Probably The Most Excited That You’ll Ever Get About a Cleaning Product”

Ninja Sphere perfects the Internet of Things

Internet of Things devices and home automation technology are, not infrequently, a bit disappointing. That’s controversial, I know, given the revolution in sensor tech, the programmable world, and the connected everything that’s supposed to be “next big thing.” And home automation is finally, after decades of being an expensive and underperforming folly, hitting the mainstream. But right now most connected devices–like the Belkin WeMo that lets you turn the standing light in your living room on and off using an app on your iPhone–is more proof-of-concept than a useful tool. And the deeper look into the connected devices space, the more problems you find. Battery life is too short. There is no standard communication protocol (and it’s unlikely that Google and Apple will voluntarily agree to one). The software needs to be updated. Continue reading “Ninja Sphere perfects the Internet of Things”