Internet of Things is already here, but how close is it?

Almost everyone has faced the maddening thought that they are miles from home but not sure whether they turned off the space heater or some other appliance.

A person might even drive back home to make sure the thing is turned off. Well, as the Internet of Things takes hold, that is at least one aggravation that may become history, because a smartphone app will be able to display whether that heater is on, and allow the user to turn it off — remotely — if it is. Continue reading “Internet of Things is already here, but how close is it?”

Can intrusion-detection systems keep hackers from messing with your connected baby monitor and door lock?

There’s a smooth, dark brown stone sitting in front of me on the table with a bright circle pulsing on its face—a signal, apparently, about the security status of Yossi Atias’s fictional Internet-connected home.

Atias is the CEO and cofounder of an Israeli startup called Dojo-Labs, one of numerous companies trying to secure the so-called Internet of things. The stone is part of its first security product, Dojo; it gets alerts via low-energy Bluetooth from a white, rectangular device that plugs into your Wi-Fi router and monitors the network activity of Internet-connected home gadgets like smart lights, TV sets, and alarm systems. Continue reading “Can intrusion-detection systems keep hackers from messing with your connected baby monitor and door lock?”

Bracelet that signs you in to your computer when you get close, presented by Intel

At today’s Intel Developer Forum event, the chipmaker showed off a prototype for a bracelet that would log you in to your computer or smartphone when you get close enough. That prototype, developed in conjunction with fashion brand Fossil, doesn’t get rid of passwords entirely: When you put it on, you enter your password. Continue reading “Bracelet that signs you in to your computer when you get close, presented by Intel”

Operators Must Pay Attention to Data Issues around Wearable Tech

If 2014 was the year of the fitness tracker, then 2015 seems destined to be the year of the smartwatch. Whilst there are a range of potential legal consequences for CSPs in becoming involved in wearable tech, from consumer and product liability issues (if the CSP retails such products) to advertising and marketing issues (in relation to the promotion of such products and services), it is the data issues which are potentially of most interest. Continue reading “Operators Must Pay Attention to Data Issues around Wearable Tech”

Disney’s Incredible iPhone Accessories Can Hear How You Touch Them (VIDEO)

Who needs sensors and circuit boards when you have ultrasonic waves? Even the simplest iPhone dock or gamepad is a relatively complex device, filled with complex electronics that allow you to press buttons or turn knobs to activate the right circuits and send a signal like “turn the volume up” to your iPhone. Continue reading “Disney’s Incredible iPhone Accessories Can Hear How You Touch Them (VIDEO)”

5 Smart Rings That Are More Useful Than Getting You Engaged

While wearables like fitness trackers and smartwatches edge their way toward the mainstream, smart rings might be next in line. These bits of connected jewelry allow consumers to control gadgets with gestures, and even check smartphone notifications from the same tiny plot of hand real estate that might house a wedding ring. Continue reading “5 Smart Rings That Are More Useful Than Getting You Engaged”

Smartphones just as accurate at tracking physical activity as wearables

Smartphone apps are just as capable of accurately tracking physical activity as fitness trackers and other wearables, a study has found.Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine and the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics at the University of Pennsylvania equipped 14 participants… Continue reading “Smartphones just as accurate at tracking physical activity as wearables”