“The invisible butler can only be good if it learns from you” – Presented by Martin Vesper, digitalSTROM

Martin Vesper, CEO, digitalSTROM AG, will speak about “The invisible butler can only be good if it learns from you. Why machine learning is so important for a great user experience in a smart home” during the Internet of Things Event, which will take place on June 07-07, 2016, at High Tech Campus Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

About Martin Vesper Continue reading ““The invisible butler can only be good if it learns from you” – Presented by Martin Vesper, digitalSTROM”

Coming our way are houses run by networked kits. Will our homes be soon smarter than we are?

There is a technological juggernaut heading our way. It’s called the Internet of Things (IoT). For the tech industry, it’s the Next Big Thing, alongside big data, though in fact that pair are often just two sides of the same coin. The basic idea is that since computing devices are getting smaller and cheaper, and wireless network technology is becoming ubiquitous, it will soon be feasible to have trillions of tiny, networked computers embedded in everything. They can sense changes, turning things on and off, making decisions about whether to open a door or close a valve or order fresh supplies of milk, you name it, the computers communicating with one another and shipping data to server farms all over the place. Continue reading “Coming our way are houses run by networked kits. Will our homes be soon smarter than we are?”

Can intrusion-detection systems keep hackers from messing with your connected baby monitor and door lock?

There’s a smooth, dark brown stone sitting in front of me on the table with a bright circle pulsing on its face—a signal, apparently, about the security status of Yossi Atias’s fictional Internet-connected home.

Atias is the CEO and cofounder of an Israeli startup called Dojo-Labs, one of numerous companies trying to secure the so-called Internet of things. The stone is part of its first security product, Dojo; it gets alerts via low-energy Bluetooth from a white, rectangular device that plugs into your Wi-Fi router and monitors the network activity of Internet-connected home gadgets like smart lights, TV sets, and alarm systems. Continue reading “Can intrusion-detection systems keep hackers from messing with your connected baby monitor and door lock?”

Much of the potential of the smart home market remains unfulfilled, study shows

The advent of smart home technology has forever altered the landscape of the residential security industry. Due to the proliferation of smartphones, today’s consumers want to have the ability to interact with systems installed in their home in a more meaningful way.

Whether that is controlling the temperature in their house while they are away or arming their security system remotely from the office, these types of features are no longer considered “nice to have” but rather “must haves” for home security providers. In fact, a recent study conducted by NextMarket Insights forecasts the combined do-it-yourself (DIY) smart device home and managed smart home services market to be worth nearly $17.5 billion by 2019. Continue reading “Much of the potential of the smart home market remains unfulfilled, study shows”

Connected devices are more reliable, but automation means complication

After two years of tinkering with complicated, ugly, frustrating and often pointless gadgets, I have experienced a connected-home system that actually works.

Pairing Philips Hue’s new hub with Apple’s Homekit software means I can turn off all my lights by simply speaking into my iPhone: “Hey Siri, turn off everything.” Off they all go, as if I had flipped a switch. This may seem a trivial feat but, believe me, this is huge progress. No fiddling around with poorly-designed apps, no anxious waiting to see if the lights do turn off, no forgotten passwords locking me out of my own network. Continue reading “Connected devices are more reliable, but automation means complication”

Home-Automation Devices: Feel Like Ordering a Pizza? Knocki Three Times on the Wall

If you have spent any time in front of a television, late at night, at any point in the last few decades of the 20th century, you can very likely sing the jingle for The Clapper, a sound-activated electrical switch. Maybe you even had one. Or maybe you have one still. It turns out that The Clapper—used to control the electrical power to any device plugged into it when it detects a user clapping—is still on the market. In fact, it’s currently ranked number four among Amazon’s best-selling home-automation devices. Continue reading “Home-Automation Devices: Feel Like Ordering a Pizza? Knocki Three Times on the Wall”