IIoT: Changes in technology that will enable greater connectivity and how it will affect your designs

Experts discuss the changes in technology that will enable greater connectivity and data gathering, and how it will affect your designs.

Overall, the IIoT is primarily a concept—better business operations through knowledge. The basic technology to achieve this concept will be smart sensors, communication buses and analytical software. Vendors are developing creative solutions within these areas. Continue reading “IIoT: Changes in technology that will enable greater connectivity and how it will affect your designs”

New Vulnerabilities and Safeguarding of IoT

The Internet of Things delivers new ways to create and capture business value, but also creates some frightening new vulnerabilities that organizations must take specific actions to address.

The rapidly expanding Internet of Things (IoT) is poised to generate huge volumes of data and deliver valuable business insights. But it also introduces substantial new risk.

A defining element of the Internet of Things (IoT) is that objects are not merely smart—equipped with sensors and processing power—but also connected: able to share the information they generate. More data, and more sensitive data, accessible across a broad network of interconnected stakeholders could pose significant dangers if compromised. As the World Economic Forum reported in March, “Hacking the location data on a car is merely an invasion of privacy, whereas hacking the control system of a car would be a threat to a life.” The rise of IoT requires enterprises to put in place systems to protect this new source of information-based value.

Organizations need to be Secure.Vigilant.Resilient.™ in order to effectively manage their enterprise cyber risks, and this paradigm also applies to IoT. By adopting a Secure.Vigilant.Resilient. approach, companies may address proliferating vulnerabilities and the rising sophistication of cyber attacks. This three-pronged, risk-based approach aims to focus organizations on their most important assets and invest in cost-justified security controls designed to protect them. It also emphasizes in equal measures a need to gain greater visibility into threats and to improve coordination of response efforts to reduce the impact of a cyber attack. Continue reading “New Vulnerabilities and Safeguarding of IoT”

Smart sensors are adding value to automation technology

The state of automation is rapidly changing, and one of the main reasons is smart devices. With such capabilities as embedded computing and storage, wired and/or wireless communications, the ability to interact with the outside world or perform autonomous actions, or some degree of descriptive or predictive analytics, smart sensors are adding value to automation technology.

In one example, a smart gas chromatograph has a built-in “software assistant” that guides even less experienced personnel through most installation, operation and maintenance procedures. Continue reading “Smart sensors are adding value to automation technology”

Will the new generation of IoT­-related data benefit us enough to be comfortable giving up even more of our privacy?

For most of us, the internet of things (IoT) might call to mind specific gadgets – slick innovations like Nest thermostats or the Apple Watch – that seem to owe their provenance to science fiction and promise a more wired world, as well as the inevitable automation of everyday life.

Then there are people like serial entrepreneur Nova Spivack, someone who’s far less enamoured of the next IoT device than he is with something infinitely geekier: the data that can be captured. Continue reading “Will the new generation of IoT­-related data benefit us enough to be comfortable giving up even more of our privacy?”

What stands in the way of the smart home and how the industry can overcome it

Smart homes should simplify our lives. When connected TVs in these residences come on, other devices are supposed to react. Ideally lights will dim, the phone’s ringer will mute and the speakers will stop playing music. When a smart household’s baby monitor notices an infant stirring in the night, the speaker in the nursery should begin to play a soft lullaby or white noise to sooth him back to sleep. Continue reading “What stands in the way of the smart home and how the industry can overcome it”

New Smart Sensor from LG to Turn Old Appliances into Connected Gadgets

LG has announced that the company will be showcasing the latest smart home technology and products at this year’s IFA 2015. The new announcements will include the SmartThinQ Sensor, which can be attached to existing home appliances, including refrigerators and washing machines, as well as the Smart Lightwave Oven and Smart Air Conditioner with support for AllJoyn. Continue reading “New Smart Sensor from LG to Turn Old Appliances into Connected Gadgets”

IoT to be growth driver for smart manufacturing by 2020

ICT deployments in manufacturing industries are currently limited to the use of machine to machine (M2M) communications and cloud solutions. But beyond that, they are also enabling qualitatively different, “smart” manufacturing operations that could transform the way a number of industries makes products, components and materials. The gradual inroads of the Internet of Things (IoT)  in industrial automation, enabled by M2M communications, will allow the development of “smart manufacturing plants” by the end of this decade. Continue reading “IoT to be growth driver for smart manufacturing by 2020”

How will businesses capitalize on the consumerization of healthcare?

While mHealth and wellness applications may appear to be interchangeable concepts, there are key differences in how they affect the life of the user as well as the business success of their providers. If your doctor advises you to begin a walking regimen for better health, you might choose to track your steps with a device to keep track of your progress. If the device and applications keep the data siloed with the individual, it would be considered a wellness product (e.g. activity trackers such as a FitBit or Jawbone. or diet apps like Lose It). Continue reading “How will businesses capitalize on the consumerization of healthcare?”