Data skepticism

If data scientists aren’t skeptical about how they use and analyze data, who will be?


A couple of months ago, I wrote that “big data” is heading toward the trough of a hype curve
as a result of oversized hype and promises. That’s certainly true. I see more expressions of skepticism about the value of data every day. Some of the skepticism is a reaction against the hype; a lot of it arises from ignorance, and it has the same smell as the rich history of science denial from the tobacco industry (and probably much earlier) onward.

But there’s another thread of data skepticism that’s profoundly important. On her MathBabe blog, Cathy O’Neil has written several articles about lying with data — about intentionally developing models that don’t work because it’s possible to make more money from a bad model than a good one. (If you remember Mel Brooks’ classic “The Producers,” it’s the same idea.) In a slightly different vein, Cathy argues that making machine learning simple for non-experts might not be in our best interests; it’s easy to start believing answers because the computer told you so, without understanding why those answers might not correspond with reality.

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Source:  Strata O’Reilly